Intermediate Training - Phase 2 - 445BG

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Intermediate Training - Phase 2

History > Phase 2 Training


After moving to Sioux City, Iowa on July 5th, 1943, where they began their second phase of training, the 445th Bomb Group received it's new combat crews. The flying personnel came pouring in from Boise, Idaho and the 18th Replacement Center in Salt Lake, Utah.

The crews continued to build confidence in each other's actions as flying operations intensified.  It was at Sioux City that the 445th suffered their first casualties.  In less than a week there were three crashes, with the first fatalities.  With the move to Sioux City came the first of many shuffles of staff members and promotions.  One noted celebrity joined the unit as Operations officer in the 703rd Bomb Squadron, then became the squadron commander: James M. 'Jimmy' Stewart.

Officer Personnel, 445th Headquarter's Detachment:

Name

Rank

Service No.

Position

 Terrill, Robert H.

Col

O-18833

 445th Group Commanding Officer

 Seashore, Malcolm D.

Lt Col

O-308240

 445th Group Executive Officer

 Frasher, Howard E.

Maj

O-363130

 445th Group Adjutant

 Jones, William W.

Maj

O-393142

 445th Group Operations (S-3) Officer

 Schwartz, Paul (nmi)

Maj

O-371869

 445th Group Deputy Commanding Officer

 Davis, Howard L.

Capt

O-374795

 445th Group Communications Officer

 Durbon, Carson (nmi)

Capt

O-728362

 445th Group Navigator

 Klopfer, Donald S.

Capt

O-729838

 445th Group Assistant Operations (S-3) Officer

 Walker, Charles P.

1st Lt

O-489366

 445th Group Supply (S-4) Officer

 Simpson, Leland S., Sr

1st Lt

O-1288801

 445th Group Bombardier

Commanding Officer's Special Staff:

Name

Rank

Service No.

Position

 Black, Neil F.

Maj

O-479819

 445th Group Flight Surgeon

 Minga, Taylor H.

Capt

O-486192

 445th Group Catholic Chaplain

 Van Laanen, John E.

Civ

26119

 American Red Cross Representative

Officer Personnel, 700th Bomb Squadron:

Name

Rank

Service No.

Position

 Fleming, Carl (nmi) Jr.

Maj

O-420584

 700th Squadron Commanding Officer

 Brewer, Thomas W.

Capt

O-448035

 700th Squadron Flight Surgeon

 Crandell, Ralph B.

1st Lt

O-560847

 700th Squadron Adjutant

 Head, Charles W., Jr.

1st Lt

O-371563

 700th Squadron Navigator

 Christensen, Thomas E.

2nd Lt

O-2043754

 700th Squadron Bombardier

 Evans, Morgan D. Jr.

2nd Lt

O-574542

 700th Squadron Intelligence (S-2) Officer

 Honaker, Charles M.

2nd Lt

O-665689

 700th Squadron Operations (S-3) Officer

 Duffner, Leo E.

2nd Lt

O-577414

 700th Squadron Supply (S-4) Officer

 Evans, George W.

2nd Lt

O-857392

 700th Squadron Communications Officer

 Peters, Wallis E.

2nd Lt

O-869570

700th Squadron Armaments Officer

 Ehart, Howard L.

2nd Lt

O-571565

700th Squadron Engineering Officer

 Rawles, Emmett H.

2nd Lt

O-578956

 700th Squadron Bomb Sight Maintenance Officer

Officer Personnel, 701st Bomb Squadron:

Name

Rank

Service No.

Position

 Kreidler, Howard E.

Capt

O-727226

701st Squadron Commanding Officer

 Miller, Orden E.

1st Lt

O-1695263

701st Squadron Flight Surgeon

 Walthall, Frank P.

1st Lt

O-562280

701st Squadron Adjutant

 Spahn, Alphonse J.

1st Lt

O-659600

701st Squadron Bombardier

 Gershenzon, Nolan (nmi)

2nd Lt

O-731288

701st Squadron Navigator

 Jones, Max L.

2nd Lt

O-568829

701st Squadron Intelligence (S-2) Officer

 Casey, Maurice F., Jr.

2nd Lt

O-735047

701st Squadron Operations (S-3) Officer

 King, Joseph E.

2nd Lt

O-578187

701st Squadron Supply (S-4) Officer

 Maher, William P., Jr.

2nd Lt

O-859644

701st Squadron Engineering Officer

 Hayes, Paul E.

2nd Lt

O-861975

701st Squadron Armaments Officer

 Martak, Clyde J.

2nd Lt

O-1553694

701st Squadron Ordnance Officer

 Somers, Gerald M.

2nd Lt

O-864855

701st Squadron Bombsight Maintenance Officer

 Dunn, George H.

W/O (JG)

W-2118892

701st Squadron Communications Officer

Officer Personnel, 702nd Bomb Squadron:

Name

Rank

Service No.

Position

 Evans, James C.

Capt

O-385477

 702nd Squadron Commanding Officer

 Halperin, Max J.

1st Lt

O-732609

 702nd Squadron Flight Surgeon

 Spayde, John C.

1st Lt

O-562099

 702nd Squadron Executive Officer

 Grove, Andrew (nmi)

1st Lt

O-568427

 702nd Squadron Intelligence (S-2) Officer

 Graham, James M.

1st Lt

O-732609

 702nd Squadron Operations (S-3) Officer

 Loyzin, Stephen (nmi)

1st Lt

O-915971

 702nd Squadron Communications Officer

 Blumencranz, Harold J.

2nd Lt

O-795188

 702nd Squadron Navigator

 Cassani, Anthony R.

2nd Lt

O-732609

 702nd Squadron Bombardier

 Bingman, Glenn J.

2nd Lt

O-578884

 702nd Squadron Supply (S-4) Officer

 Finley, Benjamin W.

2nd Lt

O-857116

 702nd Squadron Engineering Officer

 Smith, Lee M.

2nd Lt

O-579279

702nd Squadron Armaments Officer

 Brown, Russell D.

2nd Lt

O-675998

 702nd Squadron Bomb Sight Maintenance Officer

 Ashcraft, Basil C.

2nd Lt

O-1554127

 702nd Squadron Ordnance Officer

Officer Personnel, 703rd Bomb Squadron:

Name

Rank

Service No.

Position

 Stewart, James M.

Capt

O-23821

 703rd Squadron Commanding Officer

 Roeming, George C.

1st Lt

O-915947

 703rd Squadron Intelligence (S-2) Officer

 Fisher, Gilbert W.

1st Lt

O-729838

 703rd Squadron Operations (S-3) Officer

 Wienecke, Emil A.

1st Lt

O-432476

 703rd Squadron Engineering Officer

 Seymour, Martin E.

2nd Lt

O-905336

 703rd Squadron Executive Officer

 Walsh, Joseph F.

2nd Lt

O-502931

 703rd Squadron Flight Surgeon

 Dow, William E.

2nd Lt

O-860101

 703rd Squadron Armaments Officer

 Herbauger, John A.

2nd Lt

O-577891

 703rd Squadron Supply (S-4) Officer

 Meyers, James L.

2nd Lt

O-736786

 703rd Squadron Bombardier

 Kirchenbauer, Albert U.

2nd Lt

O-741788

 703rd Squadron Navigator

 Witsil, Robert V.

2nd Lt

O-1553937

 703rd Squadron Ordnance Officer

 Wright, Howard C.

2nd Lt

O-863428

 703rd Squadron Bombsight Maintenance Officer

Group Picnic held in Sioux City, Iowa in August, 1943

Just prior to the orders of transfer to overseas duty, Lt Col Robert H. Terrill, now Colonel, requested that each individual squadron hold a picnic at Riverside Park, a few miles from Sioux City, Iowa.

All of the squadrons sensed the movement was in the air and the suggestion of a party was the spark that set off the big show. All were enthused and much to-do was made over the coming event, the last for some time to come.

A few of the more fortunate ones brought their wives; the others brought their girl friends (of course the married men whose wives were not there did not bring a date). Beer was to be had by all, by the barrel and food was abundant. Little did the men know the value of the eggs that were thrown at each other as the party got going or of the beer that was spilled, for they would not taste the likes of it for a good long spell.


Role of the American Red Cross with the unit:

To most of the personnel of this group, Red Cross was only a word. They had casual acquaintance with it's work through news reports of disasters and epidemics prior to their entry into the service. They were also cognizant of the annual Red Cross drive for funds. Maybe, if they were employed, they kicked in their dollar to the fund. Beyond that, they gave the Red Cross very little thought.

Upon their entry into the service, they began to sense the presence of the Red Cross representatives in every camp at which they were stationed. Personal contacts at first were few and far between.

Such was the picture as the group came in to Wendover Field, Utah. It was there that Mr. John E. Van Laanen, Field Director, joined up with the unit. His assignment to the Group was signed in Washington, D.C., effective June 18th, 1943.

Personal contact with the Red Cross was had by only a very few of the personnel. Preparations were underway for the transfer of the unit to it's next and last stations in the States for the final phases of training, and aside from a few emergency cases handled through the base Red Cross Field Director's office, the greater part of the Group still had no contact with it.

Sioux City Army Air Base brought the first realization to the personnel of the Group that the American Red Cross was on the job to serve them. Because the pressure of training, most of the trimmings were relegated to the rear. Time could not be found for entertainment. It was here that a big part of the personnel began to realize that the Red Cross was their connecting link between themselves and their homes.

Week after week Mr. Van Laanen remained in the Red Cross office to all hours of the night. Innumerable boys were sent on their way home without delay after receiving a wire from home of some emergency demanding their presence. The Red Cross verification of the need for the soldier's presence claimed a big part of the time of the Field Director. Unnumbered cases of every imaginable type were handled by the Field Director.

Loans for the final furlough prior to going overseas capped the Red Cross service in the States. By the very nature of the unit and it's final phase of training, these leaves could not be let in any semblance of order. Crew after crew, section after section, officers and men flocked to the Red Cross office to secure a loan to enable them to make their final trip home. Those were hectic days but the Red Cross came through for the personnel of the Group in great shape, and the boys of the Group, in great numbers, had their first personal contact with the Red Cross.

During the final weeks in the States, preparation for moving overseas occupied most everyone's time. Emergency's at home were few. The ground echelon started first for it's Port of Embarkation (P.O.E.), and being the larger of the two elements, the Field Director traveled with them. The flight echelon remained behind for a period of time and was not to join the ground echelon until weeks later in England. Assurance was given the Field Director that all necessary supplies and equipment for his needs for the Group would be waiting for him at the P.O.E. There was nothing for him at the P.O.E.

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